19 Comments


  • The first time I saw a Kincade painting, I wondered where the unicorn was.

    Mia — Writer of Slightly Smudgy

    January 28, 2005
  • he’s a suburban family sitting room artist. sort of like a norman rockwell, but without the spark. something that makes a room with cream-white walls, dusty mauve curtains and overstuffed sofas homey and complete. he’s been marketed into our lifestyles. if waterhouse had been equally as commercialized, we might be finding more calenders of ophelia and the flower-picker on contemporary kitchen walls instead. ole!

    January 28, 2005
  • Tee hee

    My way of celebrating the birthday of Lewis Carroll!

    http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Dodgson.html

    January 28, 2005
  • Thomas Kinkade doesn’t put all the finishing touches on his paintings anymore. He has workshops that add “finishing touches”. He has really strange lighting issues–the glow-in-the-dark, nuclear-winter trees with orange and pink leaves that show up even in the gloaming. (I did like his San Francisco in the rain paintings, but even they got old after a while.)

    Oh well, if it makes people happy (and if I get to have fun, ranting insanely about it) then by all means, let Thomas paint away.

    I like Bob Ross better. Technically, a short notch down the scale from TK, but at least he encouraged other people to learn the basics.

    January 28, 2005
  • I’ve always thought of Kincaide as Republican art: dreadfully earnest and deeply misguided.

    Sort of the Socialist Realism of the Right.

    January 28, 2005
  • I agree with you, indeed it is so treacly that it’s a bit hard to bear.

    January 28, 2005
  • Ha! Yep, that’s the feeling they have. And nice to see you’ve staked out the Slightly Smudgy, it’s a neglected niche market.

    January 28, 2005
  • he’s a suburban family sitting room artist.

    Nice description of him. I don’t hold the marketing against him: the marketing of all visual art is ferocious. Artists are bought as much—if not more—for their cachet among hip gallery owners as anything else. The seam where art ends and hype begins is increasingly difficult to detect.

    January 28, 2005
  • Re: Tee hee

    My way of celebrating the birthday of Lewis Carroll!

    Ah, yes, of the Hudson River School of mathematicians.

    January 28, 2005
  • I loved Bob Ross. I have no idea where he stands as an artist, but watching him was like going to Art Church: soothing, reassuring and ecumenical.

    January 28, 2005
  • Republican Art is a good name for it: it captures their reactionary yearning for a time and place that never existed. And I think it’s the same yearning that shapes their worldview on non-artistic matters.

    January 28, 2005
  • My response to such art would be Lee Adam Herold’s art:
    http://www.choppingblock.org/

    That is all,
    Chris

    January 28, 2005
  • <Laughing> Man, you are just wrong!

    Yes, Chopping Block. I guess that’s what you get when you cross Edward Gorey and Thomas Kincade.

    January 28, 2005
  • Wrong? No no – go back to one of the very first ones and you’ll see this is right, very right, when Butch and the Backstreet Boys have a little get-together….

    Nice analysis!

    Chris

    January 28, 2005
  • It is my firm and unshakeable conviction that Bob Ross was/will be an Ascended Master. He taught “painting” the way that Fritjof Capra wrote about “physics”.

    In fact, he’s an official saint in my church(tm). In fact, I can imagine Kinkade as the Anti-Bob.

    Fnord!

    January 28, 2005
  • Waaaaaaaaaaaaaugh!

    January 28, 2005
  • Anonymous

    Hail, oh Writer of Light.

    (that’s all, I just wanted to call you Writer of Light)

    Bill

    January 28, 2005
  • Yeah, that’s going to enhance my literary reputation.

    January 30, 2005
  • Anonymous

    Pander of Light

    Gorzilla here.

    It’s strange that I have no problems with the Hindi religious prints I have in my house, which are actually equally saccharine. Example: Krishna (with a sweet secret smirk) and his milkmaids, no problem. I’m not talking about masterpieces from the past, I’m talking about the Asian equivalents of Jesus suffering the little children to come unto him.

    Geoff and I used to go to a coffee house that sold Kinkade prints. We actually enjoyed them, although we also thought they were quite tacky. Is that possible? Can you enjoy something while at the same time realizing it’s bad taste?

    True, Geoff wanted to graffiti them in various evil ways —

    Precious Moments, on the other hand, makes me wish I were very very wealthy so I could buy lots of them and use them to throw at passing nuclear waste trucks when I’m feeling out of sorts.

    February 16, 2005

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