15 Comments


  • Yeah, I don’t know what to make of Mr. Bradbury. He mentioned somewhere that he wants to avoid litigation, he simply wants Moore to be a “gentleman” and “give him back his book”. Pretty nervy.

    June 27, 2004
  • I think it was who said the best description of Bradbury was “poor old.” I concur.

    June 27, 2004
  • Yeah, the guy’s pushing 90. He’s wrong and he’s being an ass, but it’s hard to take him too seriously.

    Of course, I heard some popular right-wing radio pundit crying about how Michael Moore is dishonoring the grand old well-beloved author. Uh-huh. Like you guys have been reading him religiously since 1942.

    June 28, 2004
  • Anonymous

    I remember thinking when I heard the title of the film: “Hmm… Ol’Bradbury is gonna be pissed.” I’m glad he didn’t let me down 🙂

    Bill

    June 28, 2004
  • Yeah, you could just see Sean Hannity reading Fahrenheit 451 and nodding his head in agreement: “Yeah, burn all the books…”

    June 30, 2004
  • Please, writers steal titles from one another all the time. Do a google search for the title of a popular book, and I’m sure you’ll find three others with identical titles.

    June 30, 2004
  • 451: The combined IQ of the Hannity & Colmes audience.

    July 01, 2004
  • Bring it on

    I’m hoping Anne Tyler tries to kick my ass for The Accidental Terrorist.

    July 02, 2004
  • Re: Bring it on

    Exactly: kick your ass all the way to the bestseller list.

    July 02, 2004
  • Green Shadows, White Whale

    This only just occurred to me tonight in a dinner conversation, but I’ve come up with a better example than any cited in the New York Times letter for why Ray Bradbury is full of prunes.

    Every title Annie Hudson cited is a title borrowed directly from another author’s text. That’s not the case with Fahrenheit 9/11, which is a play on the title of a Bradbury work. But has Bradbury ever written a book that plays on the title of someone else’s book?

    Consider his 1992 fixup novel Green Shadows, White Whale, which is a lightly fictionalized account of the young Bradbury’s sojourn in Ireland working on the screenplay for the John Huston movie Moby Dick. Compare it with the Peter Viertel novel White Hunter, Black Heart, which was published in the ’50s and which presented a lightly fictionalized account of Viertel’s experiences in Africa working on the screenplay for the John Huston movie The African Queen.

    Now come on. Under Bradbury’s logic, Viertel should be kicking his ass from here to Mozambique.

    July 07, 2004
  • Re: Green Shadows, White Whale

    Sorry, meant Washington Post, not New York Times.

    July 07, 2004
  • Re: Bring it on

    From your mouth to God’s ear.

    July 07, 2004
  • Re: Green Shadows, White Whale

    Now come on. Under Bradbury’s logic, Viertel should be kicking his ass from here to Mozambique.

    Good point. Of course that just leads us back to the conclusion that Bradbury has become an irascible crank, more to be pitied than clubbed to his arthritic knees with a frozen tuna.

    July 08, 2004
  • Re: Bring it on

    Yeah, ’cause if god’s listening to anybody, it’s me.

    July 08, 2004
  • Re: Green Shadows, White Whale

    Oh, yes, of course. Any ass-kicking mentioned here is purely figurative, as in “Bradbury kicked Moore’s ass in the press.”

    But who knows? Maybe Bradbury was a complete gentleman and called up Viertel back in ’92 and said, “Hail, good fellow, I’d like to make the title of my next book a reference and homage to one of yours. Do you mind terribly? No? Very good, very good, thanks so much, you’re a peach.” Seems odd, but could have happened that way.

    July 08, 2004

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