21 Comments


  • Yes, yes, that’s all very nice, but can we see the pictures now? Seriously, no images loading here.

    December 08, 2004
  • You checked while I was changing the images. Try again, Mousetro.

    December 08, 2004
  • Great to see you again, if only digitally! It’s been too long since we saw one another in the flesh.

    Sounds like a really cool trip. But Queens? Seriously, this is in Queens? Wow.

    Chris

    December 08, 2004
  • Site of the 1964 World’s Fair. Crazy but true.

    December 08, 2004
  • That was a good time, despite the fact that I couldn’t get anyone in the Iowa science museum to virtually arm-wrestle me over the Internet.

    Great pictures! It looks as though we’re visitors to this strange planet, just emerging from our vessel.

    December 08, 2004
  • Nice photos! I knew of the Hall of Science, but despite being born in Queens I’ve never been there. It looks pretty promising, but for the Preschool place. Yeesh.

    Is it better than the Planetarium??

    December 08, 2004
  • Something else to do next time we waft eastward. 🙂

    Glad you had fun.

    December 09, 2004
  • And also the 1939 World’s Fair.

    December 09, 2004
  • This inspires me to get and ‘s butts down to the Cosmosphere in Hutchinson.

    December 09, 2004
  • And you might want to help them avoid the new Creation Museum coming soon to Kentucky.

    December 09, 2004
  • Oh. Dear. God.

    December 09, 2004
  • …or not, as the case may be.

    December 09, 2004
  • LOL.

    Oh. Dear. Big Bang.

    Yeah, just doesn’t have the same ring.

    December 09, 2004
  • Ah, yes, I had forgotten that. Very cool.

    You know, they also make Steinway pianos in Queens.

    December 09, 2004
  • Hey, thanks!

    Yes, Queens. New York is a surprising place—my next post will be of a salt marsh less than a mile from my house.

    December 10, 2004
  • Thank you.

    Is it better than the Planetarium?

    Well, to me the American Museum of Natural History (including the Hayden Planetarium) is the museum: the standard by which all others are judged (and found wanting). But there are a handful of museums that I’m told eclipse AMNH: the Imperial War Museum in London; the Smithsonian, especially the Air & Space Museum, in Washington; and the Chicago Field Museum. I plan to see those before I die, and make the comparison myself.

    December 10, 2004
  • Thanks. Yes, there are several class trips I’d recommend (including the American Museum of Natural History, as I mentioned above): hot dogs and french fries at Nathan’s in Coney Island; a ride on the Cyclone (dubbed “the bunny killer” by , the oldest wooden roller coaster in the U.S., also in Coney Island; The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan; the Staten Island Ferry; and the beaches of Rockaway, to name but a few.

    December 10, 2004
  • Wow, that looks VERY cool. I’m adding that to my class trip itinerary.

    December 10, 2004
  • What said.

    December 10, 2004
  • Oddly enough I don’t remember that one. But I DO recall the ’64 World’s Fair, of which my strongest memory was getting a green plastic brontosaurus still warm from the injection mold (sponsored by Sinclair Oil Company). Boy I wish I still had that.

    December 10, 2004
  • That was a good time, despite the fact that I couldn’t get anyone in the Iowa science museum to virtually arm-wrestle me over the Internet.

    Yes it WAS a good time, as was lunch afterward at the City Line Diner and Lonelyhearts Guitarist Cafe. You couldn’t get any of those red state pussies to arm wrestle because they’d heard of Shunn the Eskimo and feared his hypertrophic right arm.

    Great pictures! It looks as though we’re visitors to this strange planet, just emerging from our vessel.

    Hah! Thank you. Yes, it was a cramped trip, and the teenager who took our picture had shaking hands not just because of the cold, but because this was her first close encounter of the third kind.

    December 10, 2004

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